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What's the Latest in the Fight against Heart Disease?

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Q:  What's the Latest in the Fight against Heart Disease?

A: More and more, inflammation has been implicated as the culprit in heart and blood vessel diseases, making anti-inflammatory agents such as the omega-3 fats found in fish of interest to researchers. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been shown to play an important role in supporting cardiovascular health, and a new study published in Vascular Pharmacology now reports that lower-than-normal levels of omega-3s were found in people who had suffered vision loss and brain damage as a result of disease in the artery that carries blood from the body to the head and neck (the carotid artery).

Low omega-3s associated with more symptoms

Carotid artery plaques from 41 people having surgery to have them removed were analyzed for signs of inflammation and for their fatty acid makeup. Plaques from people with symptoms of vision loss, transient ischemic attack or stroke had a higher degree of inflammation and lower levels of EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), the two major omega-3 fatty acids from fish, than plaques from people with no symptoms. Levels of omega-6 fatty acids, which are generally considered to be inflammatory, were the same in symptomatic and asymptomatic people.

“Recommendations have previously been made regarding the amount of omega-3 content which may prove to be beneficial for cardiac protection, especially in those at risk,” the study’s authors said.

More might be the answer

These current results suggest that omega-3 fatty acids from fish might prevent stroke, adding to the evidence from a number of previous studies showing that omega-3 fatty acid consumption prevents cardiovascular disease. Here are some ways to get more in your diet:

  • Follow the advice of the American Heart Association: eat two 3-ounce servings of fatty fish per week. These include salmon, tuna, herring, and mackerel.
  • Include plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids such as non-defatted flax meal, walnuts, and oils from soy, canola, walnut, and flaxseed. These foods can increase levels of the beneficial EPA, and, unlike fish, are generally free of heavy metals and PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyl).
  • If you have heart disease or a high risk of heart disease, consider taking a daily fish oil supplement that provides 1 to 1.8 grams of omega-3 fatty acids.
(Vascul Pharmacol 2009; doi:10.1016/j.vph.2009.08.003)

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